GMAT Integrated Reasoning: Multi-Source Reasoning Example Problem #2

Example ProblemsStarting June 5, 2012, the GMAT contains a new section called Integrated Reasoning.  This 30-minute section has 12 questions of four different types: two-part analysis, multisource reasoning, table analysis, and graphics interpretation.  Below is a sample problem and solution from the TestMasters Integrated Reasoning question bank.  Check back soon for more sample problems and solutions!

PROBLEM:

TAB 1 – TECHNIQUES:
A detective analyzes crime scenes using one or more of the techniques described below–all but one of which is performed by an outside laboratory–to obtain specific information about a crime.  For each type of material listed, the detective uses only the technique described:

Situational: The detective performs territorial analysis spectrometry (TAS) in-house to locate further sources of information.
Fabric: Fiber revision (FR) is performed on any articles of clothing the victim was wearing to determine where the item is from.
Biological: Sample analysis (SA) is used to estimate the time that has passed since the crime
Witness reports: Verbal analysis studies (VAS) determine the approximate time the crime took place.

TAB 2 – CRIMES:
The detective is investigating several crime data folders which contain some situational, fabric, biological or witness reports evidence.  All of these crimes are presumed to have taken place in the city between 1990 and 1995.

In analyzing these files, the detective assumes that sample analysis is accurate to approximately +/- 2 years and verbal analysis studies are accurate to approximately +/- 1 year.

TAB 3 – BUDGET:
For outside laboratory tests, the detective’s first-year budget for investigating these crimes allows unlimited situational testing and a total of $7,000–equal to the cost of 40 FR tests or the cost of 4 VAS plus 15 SA tests –for all other tests.  For each technique applied by an outside lab, the detective is charged a fixed price.

For each of the following types of data, select Yes if, based on the detective’s assumptions, a range of dates for the crime can be obtained using one of the techniques in the manner described.  Otherwise, select No.

Yes

No

samples of perpetrator’s shirt and sweater

a passerby’s testimonial of events that took place

hair samples

SOLUTION:

Question type! Multi-Source Reasoning

Tip! Identify which type of question you are answering.

Nearly all of the multi-source reasoning questions fall into one of two categories: math or verbal.  This question is most similar to a reading comprehension question.  You need to read the information presented in the tabs, determine which parts are relevant to the question, and answer the question based on what you’ve read.

Tip! Not every multi-source reasoning question will quiz you on all three tabs of data.  Identify which tabs you need to answer the question.

This question has nothing to do with budgets, so ignore the third tab.  Likewise, you do not need to know the accuracy of the programs that estimate time, so ignore the second tab.  All you need to know is whether the types of evidence listed can be analyzed using a test that estimates dates.  This information can be found in the first tab.

According to the first tab, there are two types of analysis that can provide an estimate range of dates: sample analysis and verbal analysis studies.  Sample analysis can be performed on any type of biological evidence, such as hair, blood, or bones.  Verbal analysis can be performed on any type of crime testimonial or eyewitness report.

Tip! Multi-source reasoning questions are frequently 3 or 4 separate questions. Answer each question individually.

Let’s start with our first type of evidence: samples of perpetrator’s shirt and sweater.

This is a piece of fabric. Therefore, the only test we can perform on the sweater is fiber revision, which does not estimate dates.  Since the analysis technique does not provide a range of dates, select “No.”

Now let’s look at our second type of evidence: a passerby’s testimonial of events that took place.

A passerby’s testimonial is a type of eyewitness report, therefore it can be analyzed using verbal analysis studies.  According to the first tab, this type of analysis can determine the approximate time since the crime took place.  Since a range of dates can be obtained for the second type of evidence, select “Yes.”

Finally, let’s examine our third piece of evidence: hair samples.

Hair samples are a type of biological evidence.  Biological evidence can be used to estimate the time that has passed since the crime.  This could provide a range of dates for the crime, so select “Yes.”

Your final answer should look like this:

Yes

No

x

samples of perpetrator’s shirt and sweater

x

a passerby’s testimonial of events that took place

x

hair samples

Need more practice? Still worried about the Integrated Reasoning section or the GMAT in general?  Contact TestMasters for GMAT classes and private tutoring specialized for the new Integrated Reasoning section!

Looking for Integrated Reasoning practice? Check out the links below!

Table Analysis Example Problem #1

Table Analysis Example Problem #2

Table Analysis Example Problem #3

Multi-Source Reasoning Example Problem #1

Two-Part Analysis Example Problem #1

Two-Part Analysis Example Problem #2

Two-Part Analysis Example Problem #3

Graphics Interpretation Example Problem #1

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