Integrated Reasoning: Two-Part Analysis Example Problem #2

June 4, 2012 in Example Problems

Example ProblemsIn June of 2012, the GMAT will contain a new 12 problem Integrated Reasoning section. To help you prepare for the IR section, we are working out the problems for you! Below is a sample IR Two-Part Analysis problem from the Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC) at www.mba.com. You can find this and other integrated reasoning problems from the GMAT here.

Problem:

Integrated Reasoning Table Analysis Example ProblemSolution:

Question type! Two-Part Analysis

There is a ton of highly pertinent information in that first paragraph, so your first step should be to read that paragraph closely and make a list of all their criteria for selecting writers.

Tip! Whenever you’re given a paragraph in the Integrated Reasoning section, make a list of the information that will help you answer the question.

Your completed list should look something like this:

WRITERS:

  • five each day
  • one day: 3+ whose primary language is not English
  • other day: 4+ female writers
  • no more than 2 writers from same country each day

From the end of the paragraph, we know that four writers have already been selected for each day, and that the schedule shows the writers names, followed by their gender, primary writing language, and country of origin.

Now that we understand the information presented, let’s take a look at the question.  We are asked to do two things: select a writer who could be added to the schedule for either day and select a writer who could be added to the schedule on neither day.
Let’s start by looking for the writer who could be added to the schedule either day.

Our first step is to analyze the writers that have already been selected for each day.  Let’s make two new lists of the characteristics of the writers that have already been selected for Day 1 and Day 2.

DAY 1

  • 2 whose primary language is not English
  • 3 female writers
  • 2 writers from same country (France)
DAY 2

  • 2 whose primary language is not English
  • 2 female writers
  • 2 writers from same country (UK)

Now let’s compare these lists to the criteria in the paragraph and determine any gaps between the criteria in the paragraph and the writers selected.

Let’s start with our first criteria.  On one day, we need at least three writers whose primary language is not English.  Currently, we only have two writers whose primary language is not English on each day.  Therefore, we definitely need to add another author whose primary language is not English.  Eliminate the two writers whose primary language is English, LeGuin and Longfellow, from the chart.

Integrated Reasoning Table Analysis Example Problem

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s move on to our next criteria: on one day, we need at least four female authors.  Take another look at the Day 1 and Day 2 lists.

DAY 1

  • 2 whose primary language is not English
  • 3 female writers
  • 2 writers from same country (France)
DAY 2

  • 2 whose primary language is not English
  • 2 female writers
  • 2 writers from same country (UK)

The only day on which we could satisfy the criteria of 4+ female writers is Day 1.  On Day 2, we only have 2 female writers, so even if we added another female writer to Day 2, we still would not be meeting the criteria of 4+ female writers on one day.  Therefore, if we do not add a female writer to Day 1, there is no way we could satisfy the criteria for either day.  In order to have at least 4 female writers on one of the days, we will need to add another female author to Day 1.

Eliminate the remaining male authors from the chart.

Integrated Reasoning Table Analysis Example Problem

 

 

 

 

 

Now let’s compare the two remaining female writers based on our final criteria, we cannot have more than 2 writers from the same country on either day.  By looking at our Day 1 and Day 2 lists, we see that each day already has 2 writers from the same country.

DAY 1

  • 2 whose primary language is not English
  • 3 female writers
  • 2 writers from same country (France)
DAY 2

  • 2 whose primary language is not English
  • 2 female writers
  • 2 writers from same country (UK)

Therefore, we cannot add an author from France or the UK to either day.  This leaves us with only one writer, Murasaki, who is from Japan.  Select “Either day” next to Murasaki in the list.

Integrated Reasoning Table Analysis Example Problem

 

 

 

 

 

Now let’s answer the next part of the question: Select a writer who could be added to the schedule for neither day.  In other words, select a writer who could not be added to the schedule on either day.

Let’s start by taking another look at our list of criteria and our lists for Day 1 and Day 2.  Now, we want to look for things we can do to ensure that the listed criteria for writers will not be met on either day.

WRITERS:

  • five each day
  • one day: 3+ whose primary language is not English
  • other day: 4+ female writers
  • no more than 2 writers from same country each day
DAY 1

  • 2 whose primary language is not English
  • 3 female writers
  • 2 writers from same country (France)
DAY 2

  • 2 whose primary language is not English
  • 2 female writers
  • 2 writers from same country (UK)

Let’s start with the criteria of 4+ female writers on one day.  We should start with this criteria because we know that if we do not satisfy this criteria on Day 1, we will not meet the criteria for either day.

DAY 1

  • 2 whose primary language is not English
  • 3 female writers
  • 2 writers from same country (France)
DAY 2

  • 2 whose primary language is not English
  • 2 female writers
  • 2 writers from same country (UK)

Remember, we are looking for a writer that we could not add to the schedule on either day.  If we add another woman to Day 1, we will meet our criteria for having at least 4 female writers on one of the days.

If we added a male writer on Day 1, we would have 3 writers whose primary language was not English and only 3 female writers.  Since we can only add one more author to Day 2, even if we added a female writer to Day 2, we would only have 3 female writers on Day 2, which would not meet the criteria of 4+ female writers on one day.

Therefore, we must select a male author because he could not be added to the schedule on either day and satisfy the criteria of 4+ female writers on one day.  Eliminate all female authors on the chart.

Integrated Reasoning Table Analysis Example Problem

 

 

 

 

 

To decide between Vargas Llosa and Longfellow, let’s use the final criteria listed: we cannot have more than 2 authors from the same country on either day. If we added Longfellow on Day 2, we would have 3 writers from the same country (the UK).  Therefore, Longfellow would not work on either day.

Select “Neither day” next to Longfellow on your list.  Your final answer should look like this.

Integrated Reasoning Table Analysis Example Problem

 

 

 

 

 

 

Looking for Integrated Reasoning practice? Check out the links below!

Table Analysis Example Problem #1

Table Analysis Example Problem #2

Table Analysis Example Problem #3

Multi-Source Reasoning Example Problem #1

Multi-Source Reasoning Example Problem #2

Two-Part Analysis Example Problem #1

Two-Part Analysis Example Problem #3

Graphics Interpretation Example Problem #1